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May 31 2007

Northern Europes Rescue Boats Rushed To Gothenburg Sweden

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , — MonkeyPrincess @ 19:34PM

This weekend in Gothenburg, Sweden: Rescue boats from the Northern European Countries of Sweden, Finland, Norway, Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands and Britain are gathering together in Gothenburg harbor. A lot of us do not think about the rescue boats until there is a ferry accident or a Cruise liner disaster. If you are around Gothenburg Saturday June 2nd between 10am and 6pm you may want to visit the more then 70 different boats from various countries and take a tour and see for yourself the different features and talk to the rescue crews.

Sounds like good family fun!

RäddningsbÃ¥tarna har “öppet hus” pÃ¥ lördag

Alla de 70-talet sjöräddningsbÃ¥tar frÃ¥n nordeuropeiska länder som nu samlats pÃ¥ Eriksberg i Göteborg kommer under lördagen att “öppet hus” för nyfikna som vill gÃ¥ ombord.

 

– Besättningarna har lovat att visa bÃ¥tarna mellan klockan 10 och 18 pÃ¥ lördagen, säger Ann Jansson, informatör pÃ¥ Svenska Sjöräddningssällskapet som i helgen firar sitt hundraÃ¥rsjubileum i Göteborg.

Längs kajerna och pirarna på Eriksberg ligger nu svenska, danska, norska, finländska, tyska, holländska och brittiska räddningsbåtar.

– I kväll (fredag) har vi vÃ¥r jubileumsmiddag med 500 gäster i Eriksbergshallen, berättar Ann Jansson.
Måndag till fredag håller sedan den internationella sjöräddningsorganisationen sin kongress på Hotell 11 strax intill.

http://www.gp.se/gp/jsp/Crosslink.jsp?d=113&a=350025

 

FINNISH LIFEBOAT SOCIETY UPDATES ITS FLEET

The Finnish Lifeboat Society’s project of defining the lifeboat classes for its future fleet is nearly complete. The large, slow boats will be replaced by faster, smaller units.

The Society has decided on a fleet of boats from five rescue boat classes (PV I – PV V) and a rescue cruiser. The requirements for all lifeboat classes are a minimum speed of 30 knots, a capacity to operate independently and suitability to the Finnish climate conditions. The boats are meant specifically to be used by volunteer crews.

The availability of vessels may not be restricted to one supplier. The new lifeboat classes will be ratified by the Finnish Lifeboat Societys´s Council.

Six-metre PV I

The smallest boat, of the PV I class, is a 6.5-metre RIB (rigid inflatable boat), powered by one 115-horsepower diesel jet or an outboard motor. The maximum speed of the boat is 35 knots and it can be operated as an independent unit or as a support boat for a larger vessel. The PV I class boats take a crew of two.

This class will gradually replace the current Avon 4.0 and 5.4 RIBs and some of the current Atlantic 21 boats. The PV I class will be the largest class in the fleet of the Finnish Lifeboat Society.

THE FINNISH LIFEBOAT SOCIETY

The Finnish Lifeboat Society is the umbrella organization for voluntary maritime rescue associations in Finland.

We provide search and rescue services to people in distress at sea and on inland waters.

- 2,000 sea rescue volunteers
- over 140 rescue vessels
- over 13,000 members

- we conduct more than 1000 search and rescue missions annually

- we assist about 2400 people in waters under our watch every year

Finnish Lifeboat Society updates its fleetThe Finnish Lifeboat Society’s project of defining the lifeboat classes for its future fleet is nearly complete. The large, slow boats will be replaced by faster, smaller units.

Larger open boat PV II

PV II boats are approximately 7.5-metre RIBs. They can be operated as the sole vessel of a rescue station. PV II boats are equipped with a 115-hp twin diesel jet drive or outboard motors. The first boat of this class acquired by the Society, the Boomerang C-740, has a 115-hp four-stroke twin outboard motor. The boat reaches nearly 35 knots and is operated by a crew of three.

Boats in both of the smallest classes are fully equipped, from tools to a plotter and helmet intercoms.

Decked PV III

Although open rescue boats are functional and efficient rescue units, the core of the Society’s fleet is formed by decked rescue vessels. The smallest decked boats, PV III class, are approximately 10 metres long and equipped with a 250-hp twin diesel jet drive.

The boat is decked but has no sleeping facilities. PV III boats take a crew of three to four. The boat type can be used as an independent rescue unit for inland waterways or sheltered sea areas.

Sturdier PV IV

The larger size of the decked boats of PV IV class means better seaworthiness. The boats of this class will be used for sea areas and the most heavily trafficked inland stations.

PV IV boats are 12 metres long and powered by two diesel jet drives, with a total of 800 hp. The maximum speed of the boats is 35 knots and they take a crew of four. PV IV boats are intended to be used in medical emergencies, towage and search operations, transportation of stretcher patients, as well as crew and material deliveries under highly demanding conditions.

Offshore class PV V

The PV V class boats are the largest of the PV classes and are approximately 14 metres long. The planning-hull vessels are powered by two 700-hp diesel jet drives and their maximum speed is 30 knots. The PV V boats take a crew of five.

The PV V boats operate throughout the Baltic under all weather conditions. The boats have the best possible facilities and equipment for demanding rescue operations. Particular attention has been paid to the cabin design. The navigation system is based on four 19-inch TFT displays, and the boats have electronic joystick steering.

Boat acquisitions present a challenge

The Finnish Lifeboat Society will be decommissioning some twenty of vessels as outdated in the next few years. The acquisitions of their replacements are planned at the moment, based on the newly defined classes. The new system makes the acquisition and placement of new vessels easier and more efficient.

In 2005, the Society acquired ten new rescue boats representing PV I, PV II and PV III classes. The Society’s goal is to have acquired the first PV IV and PV V vessels by 2007.

 

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Apr 24 2007

Swedish Prostitution/Trafficking Court Case

Two of the pimps involved in the big court case here in Gothenburg have now confessed to their crimes. One man and one woman are now confessing to the charges against them.

20 men are being charged with having bought sex from Russian prostitutes.

 

We have a friend who lives in the Netherlands, where prostitution is LEGAL, and the other day when I was talking to her in instant messages, she said she was going to watch Oprah. She said that she didn’t really like the constant commercial breaks, though – I said well who does – and she then told me that at night time (one would hope way after all Dutch children have gone to bed!) the commercials on TV are mostly about sex, call girls, clubs, you name it! That’s one of the downsides with living in a country that has made prostitution legal, I suppose…

(Prostitution in the Netherlands has been legal since January 1988, when it was defined as a legal profession. However, prostitutes must be at least 18, while for non-commercial sex the age of consent is 16. Clients must be at least 16. Violation of either age limit is a crime for the other party, and possibly for a pimp.

The legalized status allows prostitutes to have access to the social security system, since 1996 sex workers have paid income tax, and reforms in 1999 gave prostitution the same status as any other form of labor. Prostitutes form unions, and are otherwise treated like any other self-employed trades person. Advertising their services is likewise tolerated.

Health and social services are readily available, but the women are not required to undergo regular health checks. A recent study found that despite health rules, about 7 percent of Dutch prostitutes have HIV/AIDS. )

 

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